Flow

The Bible of the FlowCon organization team is “Principles of Product Development Flow” by Donald G. Reinertsen. This track is all about practice in order to have a good flow of work. We will talk about kanban, reducing batch size, theory of constraints, limiting work in progress, etc. We simply won’t be FlowCon without a track to explain what the flow is!

Monday
,
November
9
,
6:00 pm
CET
Nick Tune
,
Defining Socio-Technical Boundaries with the Bounded Context Canvas

We finally have an answer to the question: "how big should a microservice be?". And the answer is: This question has been closed as off-topic. Size is really not the first thing you should be thinking about when designing boundaries. It's probably the last. Size gives us almost no indicators about the quality of our service boundaries unless we are at extreme ends of the scale.

This would be a great time to insert my silver bullet solution, but actually the Bounded Context Canvas is quite simple and boring. We made a checklist of the most important things you should think about when designing a service, and we turned it into a canvas. We then made it creative commons and put it on github. Over the past year we've been developing the canvas in the open as a community and it's currently version 4.

While the canvas is "boring", using it is fun. It reminds you to ask the important questions, and it tells you in a friendly voice "hey, the design of this bounded context has a few flaws you might want to consider".

The Bounded Context Canvas is no lone ranger. It won't magically help you find those perfect service boundaries. But when combined with a couple of other techniques like EventStorming and message flow modelling, it will set you off in the right direction and give you and your team a visual and collaborative way to design your service boundaries and interactions.

Register for the 2020 event!

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UPCOMING SESSIONS

DatE / TIME (CET UTC+1)
SPEAKER / TALK DESCRIPTION
Monday
,
November
9
,
6:00 pm
CET UTC+1
Nick Tune
,
Defining Socio-Technical Boundaries with the Bounded Context Canvas
(
EN
)
Access event
Description

We finally have an answer to the question: "how big should a microservice be?". And the answer is: This question has been closed as off-topic. Size is really not the first thing you should be thinking about when designing boundaries. It's probably the last. Size gives us almost no indicators about the quality of our service boundaries unless we are at extreme ends of the scale.

This would be a great time to insert my silver bullet solution, but actually the Bounded Context Canvas is quite simple and boring. We made a checklist of the most important things you should think about when designing a service, and we turned it into a canvas. We then made it creative commons and put it on github. Over the past year we've been developing the canvas in the open as a community and it's currently version 4.

While the canvas is "boring", using it is fun. It reminds you to ask the important questions, and it tells you in a friendly voice "hey, the design of this bounded context has a few flaws you might want to consider".

The Bounded Context Canvas is no lone ranger. It won't magically help you find those perfect service boundaries. But when combined with a couple of other techniques like EventStorming and message flow modelling, it will set you off in the right direction and give you and your team a visual and collaborative way to design your service boundaries and interactions.

Tuesday
,
November
17
,
6:00 pm
CET UTC+1
Dan Vacanti
,
The Secret History of Kanban and Why it Matters
(
EN
)
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Description

Organisations increasingly turn to Kanban to improve their Lean Agile practices, but few people know the inside story of how and why Kanban was created. The Secret History of Kanban pulls back the curtain and gives you a first-hand account of how Kanban went from being a colossal failure to a startling success. Learn how a team turned theory into practice, what it means for the future of Agile, and how you can apply those lessons in your own organisation. We’ll finish by transitioning from history to the future and what we, as a community, might do to not repeat the errors of the past.

Monday
,
November
23
,
6:00 pm
CET UTC+1
Evelyn van Kelle
,
Kenny Baas
‍How cognitive bias and ranking can foster an ineffective architecture and design
(
EN
)
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Description

How cognitive bias and ranking can foster an ineffective architecture and design

The power of collaborative modelling comes from having a diverse group of people who, together, have a lot of wisdom and knowledge. You would expect that all this knowledge will be put to use, co-creating, and to design a model. In reality, we don’t actually listen to all the available input and perspectives due to cognitive biases and ranking. Because not everything that needs to be said has been said, we will end up with sub-optimal models and architecture. Even worse, people don’t feel part of the solution and don’t commit to it. Good architecture and design needs all the insights and perception. If you are not aware, cognitive biases and ranking kills those insights and wisdom and kills the effectiveness of your models!

Join us in this talk where we will explore how we can improve our facilitation skills and focus on neuro-inclusiveness. We will dive into techniques and methods from Liberating Structures and Deep Democracy the Lewis Method. We will demonstrate how you can combine these inclusive techniques with well known collaborative modelling tools like EventStorming, Example Mapping, Impact Mapping, and User Story Mapping. We will let you leave with the knowledge on how to observe sabotage behaviour, battle oppression, and to create safety in exploring alternative perceptions. We will show you how you can really let the group say what needs to be said and take a collective autocratic decision in designing your software models.

Wednesday
,
December
2
,
6:00 pm
CET UTC+1
Sander Hoogendoorn
,
How thinking small is changing software development big time
(
EN
)
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Description

How thinking small is changing software development big time.

The world is changing fast. More precisely, the world is changing at increasing speed. This means things that were not possible five years ago come into reach. Incumbent organizations need to adapt fast to keep up with new competitors that use new technologies easier, faster and better than they do. As a result, every aspect of software changes towards smaller. Even smaller teams or even micro-teams, less management, flatter organizations, even shorter cycles, and smaller components.

Thursday
,
December
3
,
6:00 pm
CET UTC+1
Romain Couturier
,
Kanban avancé
(
FR
)
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Description

Description coming soon.

PREVIOUS SESSIONS

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SPEAKERS

Kenny Baas

A lot of knowledge is lost when designing and building software — lost because of hand-overs in a telephone game, confusing communication by not having a shared language, discussing complexity without visualisation and by not leveraging the full potential and wisdom of the people. That lost knowledge impacts the sustainability, quality and value of the software product being built. Kenny blends IT approaches like Domain-Driven Design and Continuous Delivery with visual collaboration tools, Cynefin framework and Deep Democracy. With that socio-technical mindset, Kenny Baas-Schwegler empowers and collaboratively facilitates organisations, teams and people in designing and building sustainable quality software products.

One of Kenny's core principles is sharing knowledge. He does that by writing a blog on his website baasie.com and helping curate the Leanpub book visual collaboration tool. Besides writing he is also active in the Domain-Driven Design community as an organiser of Virtual Domain-Driven Design (virtualddd.com) and Domain Driven Design Nederland and as a public speaker is giving talks and hands-on workshops at conferences and meetups.

Kenny Baas

Strategic Software Delivery Consultant

Romain Couturier

Romain Couturier

System facilitator, Agile Coach and Graphic Facilitator @ SuperTilt

Sander Hoogendoorn

Sander is an independent dad, speaker, writer, traveler. He is a freelance consultant, CTO, software architect, programmer and beyond-agile coach. He helps teams to improve their ways of working, their architectures and foremost their code. Currently he is the chief architect of IoT scale-up Quby, before he was the CTO of a number of companies. Earlier Sander was Capgemini's global agile thought leader.

He has authored books on agile, modeling, and web tools, and published many articles. Sander is an inspiring (keynote) speaker at international conferences on diverse topics such as changing culture, agile, Scrum, continuous delivery, (no) software estimation, smart use cases, patterns, software architectures, microservices, and web, JavaScript, Java and .NET development.

Sander Hoogendoorn

Chief Architect @ Quby / Founder @ ditisagile.nl

Evelyn van Kelle

Trying to make sense of the socio-technical mashup that is called software development.

Evelyn van Kelle is a strategic software delivery consultant, with experience in coaching, advising and guiding organisations and teams in designing socio-technical systems. Her Master’s degree in social sciences brings new and valuable perspectives when it comes to optimizing both delivery- and team processes.

Being a firm believer of context shaping meaning, she is focused on understanding company- and team culture before anything else. Finding the actual problem to solve and adding business value are starting points in her work. Evelyn is convinced that we need a shared sense of reality including shared values, goals and language in order to perform best as a team. She is curious, driven and pragmatic. “Continuous improvement is better than delayed perfection” describes her line of reasoning.

Besides her daily work, she has a predilection for books and linguistics, and highly appreciates good food.

Evelyn van Kelle

Strategic Software Delivery Consultant @ Xebia

Nick Tune

Technology strategy, domain-driven design, and team topologies consultant.

Nick Tune

Technical Leadership & Sociotechnical Architecture Consultant @ Empathy Software

Dan Vacanti

Daniel Vacanti is a 25-plus year software industry veteran who has spent most of his career focusing on Lean and Agile practices.  In 2007, he helped to develop the Kanban Method for knowledge work and managed the world’s first project implementation of Kanban that year.  He has been conducting Lean-Agile training, coaching, and consulting ever since. In 2011 he founded ActionableAgileTM (previously Corporate Kanban) which provides industry-leading predictive analytics tools and services organizations that utilize Lean-Agile practices.  In 2015 he published his book, “Actionable Agile Metrics for Predictability”, which is the definitive guide to flow-based metrics and analytics.  In 2017, he helped to develop the “Professional Scrum with Kanban” class with Scrum.org.  Daniel holds an M.B.A. and regularly teaches a class on lean principles for software management at the University of California Berkeley.

Dan Vacanti

Co-founder and CEO @ ActionableAgile

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